Catch Can Info/Discussion

Discussion in 'Other Almera Discussion' started by edk, Sep 2, 2011.

  1. Dan the Nissan Man

    Dan the Nissan Man

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    Location:
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    Model:
    SXE Dci 136 5dr
    Chassis:
    N16 2005
    question then...
    I noticed in recent rainy weather rainbow puddles under the car with a tiny drop of oil in them.
    An inspection of the bay has shown oil leaks from around the top breather lines & shit loads of oil around the hose that seems to join the turbo from the air filter. Where all these hoses come together near there the turbo & things like the exhaust heat shield are caked in it.
    I've used a can of EGR cleaner I had left to break it all down today & will get out there tomorrow & see what's what.
    My question is - should I disconnect these rubber hoses & remove all the oil that must be inside them, if so do I need to look out for anything that'll bite me later?
    Has our car got a catch can that could simply be stuffed with sludge?
    How did your can work out?

    Cheers
     
  2. edk

    edk Addicted to Torque Staff Member

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    Yeah take the pipes off and clean them. Can't hurt. Rubber hoses aren't oil tight, some seeps through in oil vapour from the crank case. Some small amount of vapour even through the turbo (which is normal when running fast and hot).

    Our cars do not have a catch can from factory. This is why I added one. It's worked out well do far but I think a larger capacity one is needed to really do a good job. If you bought the ebay type one like I did then you MUST do the mods I did or similar to give it any function at all.

    There's a custom catch can place in the US that a lot of the Sentra buys are using now and I intend to get one myself. If you're interested it might be something that would be worth doing as a group buy now we've got a few derv heads here.
     
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  3. Dan the Nissan Man

    Dan the Nissan Man

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  4. Mad Maru

    Mad Maru

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    Location:
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    Model:
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    This looks like a product I found on eBay after searching for a catch tank it's from a different company but looks the same in terms of design. Here is the eBay number: 300898277612 and priced at £86 unfortunately £105 postage makes this a no for my needs which is a shame.


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  5. Mad Maru

    Mad Maru

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    Info from description I thought added a good insight without images:
    REVIEW

    The common mistake made when buying an Oil Catch Can is that people are fitting units that reduce the size of the breather tubes. For the professional aftermarket parts developer the mantra is to keep to the same design performance as the OEM manufacturer ... OR BETTER. By keeping to this set of guidelines, upgrading your vehicle with after-market parts will not compromise on safety or reliability. In this case on Positive Crankcase Ventilation (PCV) Systems keeping to the OEM manufacturer's design rules means having no less an outlet breather tube size than original. Oil catch cans inlets and outlets need to be of the same diameter as that of the OEM. There is a reason for this: The manufacturer is concerned with keeping the crankcase free of pressure build up. Cheap $40.00 oil catch cans from eBay etc with have tiny 10 -12mm inlets/outlets, or fittings acting as reducers, reduce the flow rates of the PCV System thus causing back-pressure in the crankcase. This build-up of pressure causes engine oil to weep from the crankcase seals etc as they were not made to hold pressure. Pound for pound, diesel engines have more blow-by past the rings than petrol engines and thus flow through the PVC System is higher. We certainly do not want to hold back any pressure here. I have found one type of Oil Catch Can that fits the bill and we have it in our line up of products.

    These specially made Hi Performance ProVent® Style HP200 Oil Catch Can do an excellent job of filtering out the oil from the crankcase gasses that are re-entering the engine through the factory setup … and they do this WITHOUT restricting flow.

    In this picture above you can see the very large inlet and outlet size. At 24mm OD the outlets are much bigger than any other oil catch can!

    In my opinion, superior to any other style of Oil Catch Can for another reason, it has 2 relief valves. (most other types have none). One is situated on the inlet side to relieve high pressure, the other on the outlet side to relieve any low pressure. Again, this stops any pressure build up even if the filter becomes blocked from you not cleaning it. It’s a great engine safe guard! Keeping the oil out of the air intake will benefit in 2 ways Firstly, oil mist in the air intake entering into the combustion chamber will reduce the octane rating of the combustible fuel. Mainly in petrol engines, this leads to a symptom called "pre-ignition". Pre-ignition is one of the quickest ways to damage cylinder heads, piston crowns and piston rings. Secondly, (and the main reason) oil entering into the intake manifold combines with the heated gases of the Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) (300-400 deg Cel) and literally bakes to form carbon build-up in the manifold. This carbon build-up, over a relatively short period, restricts the volume of air that would normally be allowed to flow through the manifold into the combustion chamber. (See pictures). The less flow, the less performance. This is well noted on late model Mitsubishi, Toyota and Nissan vehicles.

    What your engine is breathing from the EGR System


    The last picture shows a CLEANED intake manifold. (same manifold as shown above in the first 3 pics) If you could start with this and add the Oil Catch Can then this would be best. Blocking the EGR System is also advisable.


    CLEANED PAJERO MANIFOLD

    Looking at this pic above and comparing with the 3rd pic of the manifold it looks like No 4 cylinder was getting no air at all !! The modern diesel engine manufacturer’s idea of emission control that ruins your engine hoping that the problem occurs AFTER your warranty period has expired. They laugh all the way to the bank of course. The Chip Tuning HP200 Oil Catch Can has a replaceable element. Maintenance on these is easy too since no actual fittings or pipework is removed to replace / clean filter element. Fitment check list: Keep Oil Catch Can hoses away from turbo or hot exhaust manifolds as much as possible. If a hose travels close to a heat source, shield it. There are arrows on the side of the HP200 to advise direction of flow. The top inlet is connected to the rocker cover (ie VAPOUR IN). The bottom outlet is connected to the air intake. (VAPOUR OUT).

    This totally sealed system makes the Oil Separator completely legal.

    Chip Tuning HP200 Oil Separator Dimensions: 109mm width x 221mm height Bracket mounting hole centre to centre 122mm. Outlets 24mm OD or 25mm including swage.

    The Kit comes complete with:

    Filter Housing
    Filter Element
    Clip on Mounting Bracket
    Hose Connection Heat Shrink (to save on expensive hose reducers / adaptors)
    Oil Drain that can be capped off or returned to the sump
    Totally legal to fit
    Universal fitment




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  6. Dan the Nissan Man

    Dan the Nissan Man

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    Location:
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    Model:
    SXE Dci 136 5dr
    Chassis:
    N16 2005
    Certainly knows his stuff...
    So I just need a chamber with an input & output & many surfaces to condense oil upon?.

    Cant be too hard to find....
     
  7. cyris

    cyris

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    Model:
    Almera 1.8
    Chassis:
    2002 N16
    Sorry to revive an old thread, but I tried to replace the breather hoses that came with the catch can which started to tear. I replaced them and neatened up my breather hoses to and from my catch can and had an idea that I tried and wanted to know if it will cause any harm to the engine itself, reading so far says no, but correct me if I assume incorrectly please.

    I blocked off the breather point on the intake pipe and on the intake manifold that comes from the PCV. I re-routed the breather hose and PCV hose to the catch can, which then has a breather filter on. Hope the picture below is clear enough. X = blocked off, Blue = re-routed breather hoses.
    [​IMG]

    Car started and drove fine, power delivery is still the same. Wanted to do this to avoid moisture and oil getting back into the engine via intake system
     
  8. Spyke

    Spyke Horse Whisperer

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    Jerk
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    What engine is this on? That system will be doing absolutely nothing if it's setup how you have it in the picture.


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  9. Sam

    Sam Moderator Staff Member

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    you need to run the breather outlet back to the intake pipe if you want to keep it like that
     
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